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Diagram of the education system

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  • Diagram of education system in country language


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  • Education system in Chile

    Chile
    ECEC staff, leaders and their working conditions (Starting Strong Survey 2018)
  • Compared to other participating countries, Chile has a large percentage of staff with a level of education above secondary level (87%), but a relatively low percentage of staff that received practical training (45%) and training to specifically to work with children (74%).
  • Chile has the lowest gaps between percentages of staff who report using practices that facilitate children's socio-emotional development and practices that facilitate children's numeracy, literacy and language development.
  • ECEC staff in Chile work with large groups of children (on average 24 children per group).
  • Staff practices that involve engaging parents or guardians (e.g. providing workshops on child-rearing/development or informing parents about daily activities) are particularly common in Chile.
  • Chile has the highest percentages of centres with a large share of children from socio-economically disadvantaged homes. More than in other participating countries, publicly managed centres in Chile are more likely to include large shares of children from socio-economically disadvantaged homes than privately managed centres.
  • Chile also has the highest percentage of centres with large shares of children with special needs. Supporting children with special needs is a top spending priority for staff.
  • Most staff in Chile (97%) are satisfied with their jobs, but a relatively small percentage of staff are satisfied with their salary (31%) or report feeling valued in society (40%).
  • Professional development is common in Chile (83% in the last 12 months), however, large percentages of staff indicate high financial costs and lack of staff compensation for their absence as a barrier.
  • A relatively small percentage of leaders indicate having responsibilities for budget allocation (24%) and the appointment and recruitment of staff (53%) within the centre.
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    The following list displays indicators for which your selected country shows the highest and lowest values among countries. The list can be sorted by level of education or by age group. All rankings are calculated including available data from OECD and partner countries. Find out more about the methodology here.

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    ECEC centre external evaluations

    A small proportion of leaders report receiving an inspection regarding process quality at least once every year. (16.9 %, rank 6/8 , 2018) Download Indicator

    School neighbourhood environment

    Chile has one of the lowest percentage of ECEC leaders who report that the ECEC centre's neighbourhood is a good neighbourhood to bring up children. (73.7 %, rank 8/8 , 2018) Download Indicator

    Chile has one of the lowest percentage of ECEC leaders who report that there are public places in ECEC centre's neighbourhood where children can play safely . (59.5 %, rank 8/8 , 2018) Download Indicator

    Parental involvement

    In Chile, the share of leaders reporting that their centre provided workshops or courses regarding child-rearing or child-development over the 12 months prior to the survey is relatively large. (10.4 %, rank 1/6 , 2018) Download Indicator

    In Chile, a large proportion of staff reported that ''parents or guardians are encouraged by ECEC staff to do play and learning activities with their children at home'' describes ''well'' or ''very well'' how they engage with parents/guardians at their ECEC centre. (89.8 %, rank 2/8 , 2018) Download Indicator

    Opportunities for children's participation in decisions in the centre

    In Chile, a high percentage of leaders agree or strongly agree that the centre provides opportunities for children to actively participate in decisions (31.7 %, rank 2/8 , 2018) Download Indicator

    Public and private expenditure in education

    Chile has a relatively low percentage of ECEC leaders who reported receiving funding from public sources over the last 12 months. (89.1 %, rank 7/8 , 2018) Download Indicator

    Chile has one of the lowest percentage of ECEC centre leaders who reported receiving at least one source of private funding. (37.1 %, rank 7/8 , 2018) Download Indicator

    Who the ECEC staff are

    Compared to other TALIS participating countries, Chile has a small proportion of female among ECEC staff. (94.8 %, rank 6/8 , 2018) Download Indicator

    Among TALIS countries, Chile has a low proportion of ECEC staff aged 50 or older. (16 %, rank 6/8 , 2018) Download Indicator

    Who the ECEC leaders are

    Compared to most other TALIS countries, Chile has a low percentage of female ECEC centre principals. (76.8 %, rank 6/8 , 2018) Download Indicator

    In Chile, the leaders' experience in terms of number of years is relatively low. (10.7 Years, rank 6/8 , 2018) Download Indicator

    Education and initial preparation of ECEC staff

    The share of staff who have received training specifically to work with children is one of the smallest among TALIS participating countries and economies. (73.7 %, rank 6/8 , 2018) Download Indicator

    In Chile, the percentage of staff for whom practical training was included in the programme that prepared them to work with children is relatively low. (45.2 %, rank 8/8 , 2018) Download Indicator

    In Chile, the percentage of staff whose formal education or training programme included working with parents or guardians/families is relatively low. (68.4 %, rank 7/8 , 2018) Download Indicator

    Compared to most other TALIS countries, a smaller proportion of staff report that working with dual/second language learners was included in their formal training programme. (18.7 %, rank 6/6 , 2018) Download Indicator

    Compared to most other TALIS countries, a smaller proportion of staff report that working with children with special needs was included in their formal training programme. (56.2 %, rank 7/8 , 2018) Download Indicator

    Professional development of ECEC staff

    In Chile, the percentage of staff whose professional development activities over the 12 months prior the survey included facilitating transitions to primary education is relatively high. (48.5 %, rank 2/8 , 2018) Download Indicator

    Compared to most other TALIS countries, a larger proportion of staff ''agree'' or ''strongly agree'' that the lack of staff to compensate for their absences is a barrier to their participation in professional development. (32.9 %, rank 2/8 , 2018) Download Indicator

    Compared to most other TALIS countries, in Chile a larger proportion of staff ''agree'' or ''strongly agree'' that professional development being too expensive is a barrier to their participation in professional development. (33.4 %, rank 1/8 , 2018) Download Indicator

    Compared to most other TALIS countries, a larger proportion of staff whose professional development activities over the 12 months prior the survey included working dual language learners. (21.9 %, rank 5/7 , 2018) Download Indicator

    Compared to most other TALIS countries, a larger proportion of staff whose professional development activities over the 12 months prior the survey included working with children with special needs. (56.4 %, rank 2/8 , 2018) Download Indicator

    ECEC staff practices facilitating socio-emotional development

    Chile has a relative small share of staff who reported that hugging the children is a practice that applies a lot in their ECEC centre. (63.1 %, rank 6/8 , 2018) Download Indicator

    ECEC staff beliefs about skills and abilities that will prepare children for the future

    In Chile, a small percentage of ECEC staff believe that children's ability to cooperate easily with others is highly important in preparing children for the future. (80.5 %, rank 7/8 , 2018) Download Indicator

    ECEC staff beliefs about spending priorities

    In Chile, a large proportion of staff who responded that improving ECEC staff salaries was “of high importance” if, the budget were to increase by 5%. (87.5 %, rank 2/8 , 2018) Download Indicator

    In Chile, a large proportion of staff who responded that supporting children with special needs was “of high importance” if, thinking about the ECEC sector as a whole, the budget were to increase by 5%. (90.1 %, rank 1/8 , 2018) Download Indicator

    In Chile, a large proportion of staff who responded that offering high quality professional development for ECEC staff was “of high importance” if, the budget were to increase by 5%. (88.3 %, rank 1/8 , 2018) Download Indicator

    Teaching in multicultural settings

    Compared to most other TALIS countries, a larger proportion of staff report that children playing with toys and artefacts from cultures other than the ethnic majority happens ''to some extent'' or ''a lot'' in their center. (52 %, rank 2/8 , 2018) Download Indicator

    In Chile, a high percentage of leaders reported high levels of agreement amongst their staff that learning children as early as possible to respect other cultures emphasises the importance of multicultural and gender diversity. (96.3 %, rank 1/7 , 2018) Download Indicator

    Working conditions of ECEC staff

    In Chile, a relatively small percentage of staff reported that having too many children in their classroom is a source of stress. (37.1 %, rank 6/8 , 2018) Download Indicator

    In Chile, the percentage of staff who ''agree'' or ''strongly agree'' with the statement ''all in all, I am satisfied with my job'' is comparatively high. (96.8 %, rank 2/8 , 2018) Download Indicator

    In Chile, the percentage of staff with permanent contracts is comparatively small. (66.4 %, rank 6/8 , 2018) Download Indicator

    According to leaders, in Chile a relative small share of staff left their ECEC centre in the previous year. (8.2 %, rank 7/8 , 2018) Download Indicator

    Organisation of the education system

    Compared to most other TALIS countries, Chile has a high proportion of ECEC centre leaders who report that there is communication with primary school teachers in their centre. (42.3 %, rank 2/8 , 2018) Download Indicator

    Governance

    A small proportion of leaders report that they or other centre staff have significant responsibility for deciding on budget allocations within their centres. (24.1 %, rank 8/8 , 2018) Download Indicator


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    General findings
    
                            
    • Across countries participating in the Starting Strong Survey, more than 90% of ECEC staff are female. Furthermore, more than 80% of leaders are female in all countries with the exception of Chile (77%), Japan(64%) and Turkey (25%).
    • The highest proportion of ECEC staff under 30 years old is found in Korea (43%) followed by Turkey and Japan where more than 30% of ECEC staff belongs to this age group. On the other hand, Germany, Israel and Iceland have more than one quarter of ECEC staff aged above 50. More than half of ECEC centre leaders are aged 50 or more in Iceland, Germany, Korea and Chile and in Japan the eight out of ten centre leaders are above 50.
    Visualisations
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    • Staff in the ECEC field have typically completed education beyond secondary school,. Training specifically to work with children is not universal, ranging from 64% of staff in Iceland to 97% of staff in Germany. Staff with more education and training and more responsibility report that they adapt their practices in the classroom or playroom to individual children's development and interests.
    • In all countries, a majority of staff (more than 75%) report having participated in professional development activities within the 12 months prior to the Survey,. However, staff who are less educated tend to participate less in professional development activities.
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    • Around 70% of staff report regular use of practices facilitating children's socio-emotional development (such as encouraging children to help each other) or practices facilitating children's language development (such as singing songs or rhymes). Specific practices emphasising literacy and numeracy (such as playing with letters or playing number games) are used to a lesser extent.
    • The ability to co operate easily with others is at the top of the list of skills and abilities that ECEC staff regard as important for young children to develop.
    • Exchanging information with parents regarding daily activities and children's development is common. Smaller percentages of staff report encouraging parents to play and carry out learning activities at home with their children.
    • Staff across countries and levels of education concur that reducing group size, improving staff salaries and receiving support for children with special needs are important spending priorities.
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    • Staff in all countries report feeling more valued by the children they serve and their parents or guardians than by society in general. Satisfaction with salaries is low. Even so, staff report high levels of overall job satisfaction. In several countries, staff who feel that ECEC staff are more valued by society report more use of practices in the classroom or playroom adapted to individual children's development and interests.
    • Lack of resources and having too many children in the classroom or playroom are major sources of work-related stress among ECEC staff. For centre leaders, a primary source of work-related stress is having too much administrative work associated with their job. Leaders also report that inadequate resources for the centre and staff shortages are the main barriers to effectiveness.
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    • Nine of ten ECEC centre leaders report receiving funds from public sources in the last 12 months in all countries excepted for Turkey (71%). On the other hand, more than 70% report receiving private funding in all countries excepted for Chile and Iceland (37% and 33%, respectively).
    • Across all countries participating in the Starting Strong Survey, only in Turkey more than half of ECEC centres are co-located with a primary school. This is the case for only 30% of centres in Japan and for less than 10% of centres in Israel, Japan, Germany and Norway.
    • Public management of centres ranges from more than 90% in Israel to less than 30% in Germany
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    Key
    Country Reviews for Chile

    Note: These values should be interpreted with care since they are influenced by countries' specific contexts and trade-offs. In education, there is often no simple most- or least-efficient model. For instance, the share of private expenditure in education must be read against other measures designed to mitigate inequities, such as loans and grants; longer learning time is an opportunity to convey more and better content to students, but may hinder investments in other important areas. If you want further information on the nature of different variables, please take the time to read the analysis and contextual information, available at the website for each publication.
    All rankings for individual variables are compiled on the basis of OECD and G20 countries for which data are available. The OECD average includes only OECD countries which are listed here: http://www.oecd.org/about/membersandpartners/

    Reference years displayed in the Education GPS correspond to the most common year of reference among countries for which data is available on each variable. Some countries may have provided data refering to another year, to know more about possible exceptions on data please click on the "Download Indicator" link on each variable. When a year of reference corresponds to a school year encompassing two years, the reference reads as follows: 2018 for school year 2017/2018.

    *TALIS averages are based on all countries participating in the TALIS survey, including partner countries and economies. This explains the difference between the OECD average and the TALIS average. Data from the TALIS survey and Education at a Glance (EAG) may differ. See Annex E of the TALIS technical report and Annex 3 of EAG 2019 for more details about the data collections.

    B-S-J-Z (China) refers to the four PISA-participating provinces/municipalities of the People's Republic of China: Beijing, Shanghai, Jiangsu and Zhejiang.

    For additional notes, please refer to annexes in the list of links below the introductory country profile text.