Search for specific education indicators by country, theme or level of education and compare the results using interactive charts and tables.

Base Theme

Survey of Adult Skills (PIAAC): Full selection of indicators
Education at a Glance 2013: Full selection of indicators
PISA 2012: Full selection of indicators
TALIS 2013: Full selection of indicators
The output of educational institutions and the impact of learning (Chapter A, EAG 2013)
Financial and human resources invested in education (Chapter B, EAG 2013)
Access to education, participation and progression (Chapter C, EAG 2013)
The learning environment and organisation of schools (Chapter D, EAG 2013)
Early childhood education and care
Gender differences in education
Impact of the global economic crisis on education
PISA 2012: Full selection of indicators
The OECD Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) focuses on young people's ability to use their knowledge and skills to meet real-life challenges. This orientation reflects a change in the goals and objectives of curricula themselves, which are increasingly concerned with what students can do with what they learn at school and not merely with whether they have mastered specific curricular content. Since the year 2000, every three years, fifteen-year-old students from randomly selected schools worldwide take tests in the key subjects: reading, mathematics and science, with a focus on one subject in each year of assessment.
The latest set of results from the 2012 data collection (PISA 2012) focuses on mathematics and compares the competencies of students in 65 countries and economies.
Around 510 000 students between the ages of 15 years 3 months and 16 years 2 months participated in PISA 2012 representing about 28 million 15-year-olds globally.

  • In 2012, Asian countries as Shanghai-China, Singapore, Hong Kong-China, Chinese Taipei, Japan and Korea have the highest scores in mathematics, reading and science. The only exception is Finland, which also is among the top five performers in science.
  • Some countries, such as Mexico, Turkey and Germany, improved both their mathematics performance and their levels of equity in education between PISA 2003 and PISA 2012.
  • PISA reveals that in most countries and economies, far too many students do not make the most of the learning opportunities available to them because they are not engaged with school and learning.
  • Stratification in school systems, which is the result of policies like grade repetition and selecting students at a young age for different "tracks" or types of schools, is negatively related to equity; and students in highly stratified systems tend to be less motivated than those in less-stratified systems.
  • PISA also shows that the impact of socio-economic status on problem-solving performance is weaker than it is on performance in mathematics, reading or science.

  • The 2015 assessment will focus on science literacy. The information collected through background questionnaires also provides context which can help analysts interpret the results.


    | PISA 2012 | PISA 2012 key findings | About PISA (video) | PISA 2012 Assessment and Analytical Framework | Glossary |
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    OECD average

    Non-OECD Countries

    TALIS average*
    Argentina
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    Indonesia
    Russian Federation
    Saudi Arabia
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    Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates)
    Albania
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    Note: These values should be interpreted with care since they are influenced by countries' specific contexts and trade-offs. In education, there is often no simple most- or least-efficient model. For instance, the share of private expenditure in education must be read against other measures designed to mitigate inequities, such as loans and grants; longer learning time is an opportunity to convey more and better content to students, but may hinder investments in other important areas. If you want further information on the nature of different variables, please take the time to read the analysis and contextual information, available at the website for each publication.
    The OECD average includes only OECD countries which are listed here: http://www.oecd.org/about/membersandpartners/

    *TALIS averages are based on all countries participating in the TALIS survey, including partner countries and economies. This explains the difference between the OECD average and the TALIS average. Data from the TALIS survey and Education at a Glance (EAG) may differ. See Annex E of the TALIS technical report and Annex 3 of EAG for more details about the data collections.

    For additional notes, please refer to annexes in the list of links below the introductory text.